How to Choose an Art School

Choosing an art school, like any post-secondary institution, can be an exciting but daunting process. There are many factors to consider, including but not limited to location, cost, academic programming, and reputation. Below are some tips for finding an art school that works best for you.

1. Check out the faculty

One of the great things about art school is that many members of the faculty are established, practicing artists. When considering different schools, see who you will likely be studying under and do some research on your potential professors: do they have similar interests, do they have skills you would like to learn? Are they well connected in the art world? Figure out Continue reading

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How to Write an Artist’s CV When You Don’t Have Much (Or Any!) Professional Experience

notepadThe post How to Write an Artist CV in 10 Steps is the most popular in the history of The Practical Art World. Some of the most frequently asked questions people have after reading it are “What if I don’t have an exhibition history?” or “What if I didn’t go to school?”

For new and emerging artists, creating an artist’s CV can be a bit of a Catch 22. You don’t have much or any experience to put on your CV, but to apply for “experience” in the form of exhibitions, grants, and schooling, you are asked to provide a CV.

Fortunately, there are ways to tailor what relevant experience you have into an artist’s CV format. Continue reading

Spring Cleaning for Art Studio Happiness and Efficiency

When the outside world begins to warm up, it’s a great time to open your windows and get some serious cleaning done! Although avoiding creative work by focusing on housework is a cliché, sometimes, you really do need to get some serious cleaning done. Also, having a well-organized and harmonious space can be great for your creative mind.  Below are some suggestions for cleaning up your workspace to improve efficiency and happiness in your studio.

De-clutter by creating four piles: keep, throw away, donate, sell.

Keep: See “Reorganize” below

Throw Away: Superfluous clutter can easily grow if you let it! Reassess Continue reading

New Years Resolutions for the Artist

flower1. I will take advantage of feedback from others, but above all I will trust my own judgement.

2. I will set aside time each day to make art or think about art. The amount of time is not important.

3. I will set concrete goals for myself, and then take the steps to reach them, even though it will be difficult and scary.

4. I will write down a list of things I have avoided doing (example: showing artwork in public, calling a gallery to see if they are accepting submissions.) I will do these things.

5. I will not be self-deprecating when speaking about my art. While I can recognize a need for improvement, I will also honor the labor and vision of my art.

Image: Igor Novosel

What Should You Include in a Portfolio Submission (Which Artworks, How Many)?

It can be daunting to choose a certain number of your artworks to include in a portfolio submission. Do you pick your favourites? Do you pick other people’s favourites? Do you only pick new works? Read the tips below to help chose your absolute best selection of art works for any submission.

Pay attention to what they want

This is the #1 golden rule of submissions! Continue reading

5 Places to Find Free Art Education & Inspiration

1. Art Supply Manufacturers 

Many artist-grade product manufacturers offer loads of free information about how to use their products. Much of this information can be applied to your studio practice in general, even if you don’t end up purchasing their product. The highest quality artist materials manufacturers tend to have the most in-depth and thorough material; their commitment to artists is obvious.

Winsor & Newton
Winsor & Newton makes a large assortment of artist-quality paints and painting accessories. Visit their Resource Centre for instructional videos, Continue reading

10 Weeks to Improve your Artistic Career – Week 9

Week 9: Exhibit your work

Exhibiting your artwork has endless benefits for your artistic career. You could say it is the most important things in building a solid practice! When you exhibit your artwork:

  • it is viewed by peers, clients, potential clients, fans of art, writers, curators, friends, etc
  • usually an exhibition involves working with other artists, and / or galleries, curators, or professionals in the artistic field and can give you excellent experience
  • you learn from your mistakes
  • you engage in dialogue about your work
  • it adds credibility to your CV. With exhibitions on your CV, you stand a better chance for receiving grants, scholarships, exhibition opportunities, residencies, and more.

Strangely enough, exhibiting their own artwork is one thing that a large number of artists do not do. There are many excuses why not to pursue exhibition opportunities for yourself, such as: Continue reading